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Cautionary Remarks From An Azusa Pioneer

In 1925, Frank Bartleman, a journalist and itinerant Holiness evangelist turned Pentecostal wrote How Pentecost Came to Los Angeles, recording his close recollections of the Azusa Street revival, which began in 1906.  Writing fifteen years after the initial outpouring that brought thousands into the fledgling movement, Bartleman offers poignant criticisms of Pentecostals, who by the […]

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Terrible Tresses: the Maleficent Meaning of the Hair of Witches

  The witch-hunt mania in mediaeval Europe and early America did much to crystallize cultural ideas about witches and their diabolical craft. The iconography of witches has adapted over time but has consistently drawn from established motifs in its depiction of practitioners of the Dark Arts. One of the most commonly repeated elements in artistic […]

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Man with a Mission: Frank Bartleman at Eighth and Maple

by Matthew Shaw Frank Bartleman, who was so instrumental in the advent of Pentecost in Los Angeles, was an itinerant in spirit.  He was possessed of a mild but mercurial nature, which led him hither and yon working for the cause of the Kingdom.  Bro. Bartleman seemed always to be looking for the next deeper […]

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Frank Emerson Curts: Laborer for Christ

Famed Indiana author, Kurt Vonnegut, once wrote: “I don’t know what it is about Hoosiers. But wherever you go there is always a Hoosier doing something very important there.” This was certainly true of the late Superintendent of the Ohio District of the United Pentecostal Church, Bro. Frank Curts, who hailed from Indiana but spent […]

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